Posts Tagged ‘suspension bridge’

Cascade Falls Suspension Bridge

Cascade Falls and the new suspension bridge in Cascade Falls Regional Park near Mission, British Columbia, Canada

cascade falls suspension bridge in cascade falls regional park

Cascade Falls Suspension Bridge

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   The new Cascade Falls Suspension Bridge is now open in Cascade Falls Regional Park. I have been waiting for this for a while as last year I tried to visit Cascade Falls but the park was closed for construction. I had some concerns that this would somewhat ruin the feeling of the park and the falls lookout, but I enjoyed what they have there now. Previously, a clear view was rather tough to come by (without jumping a fence) and this new bridge really gives a clear view of the falls from several viewpoints. The layout here (suspension bridge next to a waterfall) is reminiscent of the Lynn Canyon bridge in North Vancouver, but isn’t nearly as long. The view here is also a bit better I’d say, and doesn’t have the tourist trap atmosphere (or cost) of the Capilano bridge. The Cascade Falls suspension bridge spans 35 meters (115 feet) from one side to the other which makes it the shortest of the 3 Vancouver area suspension bridges.

cascade falls in cascade falls regional park

Cascade Falls from main viewing platform

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   After a brief (but not flat) hike up the trail to the falls you reach the first view point next to the suspension bridge (photo 2 above). This is close to where the older viewing platform was located and gives a similar view. From there you can cross the suspension bridge to the second platform. The initial step onto the bridge is rather steep, and if this were any other sort of surface it would be rather slippery. The metal covering the bottom of the bridge gives a really good grip, and you won’t likely be slipping on it unless it was covered in ice. The bridge does not bounce much when walking on it, which I am sure many will appreciate. This might be different if there were 20 people walking across it, but I was mostly alone during my trip there a few days ago (a weekday). The first third of the suspension bridge gives a good view of the falls, as well as a view downstream of Cascade Creek (below).

cascade creek in cascade falls regional park

Cascade Creek below the suspension bridge

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   The viewing platform on the other side of the suspension bridge gives a completely new view of Cascade Falls. After a good breeze came up I had a lot of mist from the falls to contend with – which would be a nice feature on a hot day. My photos from here still look a little strange to me, as I am so used to seeing the usual view of the falls, this looks like a bit of a different place. The view from the new viewing platform is a bit better as there aren’t the rocks obscuring the view of the pool below the falls is the case with the first platform.

cascade falls in cascade falls regional park

Cascade Falls from second viewing platform

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   When I was here I was lucky to photograph Cascade Falls with good cloud cover (and even light), but shortly after this the sun came out. The first platform before the bridge gave a great perspective on the rainbow at the base of the falls.

cascade falls in cascade falls regional park

Rainbow at Cascade Falls Regional Park

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For more of my photographs from this and surrounding areas please visit my Fraser Valley Gallery in my Image Library.

The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge

The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge in Lynn Canyon Park, North Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

lynn canyon suspension bridge

The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge

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   The Lynn Canyon Suspension Bridge at Lynn Canyon Park in North Vancouver is always best photographed on gloomy days. There are fewer reflections off of the trees and the metal floor of the bridge. Each time I visit this bridge I am reminded how much more satisfying the experience here is compared to the more famous, larger, Capilano Suspension Bridge. The bridge in Lynn Canyon is not only free, it offers a much more scenic and natural location and without any of the “tourist trap” feel of the Capilano Bridge. On my trip here last fall I did some hiking and also photographed Twin Falls which is just downstream. If you visit I highly recommend you head down the stairs, stairs and more stairs to the falls, though I be aware it is probably full of fence hopping swimmers in the summer months.

Vancouver’s Lions Gate Bridge at Night

Cars (and a bicyclist on the left) cross the Lions Gate Bridge from Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia to/from North Vancouver at night.

traffic on the lions gate bridge at night from stanley park, vancouver

Vancouver’s Lions Gate Bridge from Stanley Park (Purchase)

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   I think that I photograph the Lions Gate Bridge from one angle or another every time I go to Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada. I just can’t resist. Yesterday I again tried photographing the bridge from this overpass on Stanley Park Drive. I’ve been here before, and pulled off a lucky (for me at the time) film shot of this about 10 years ago. Since making the move to digital I’ve never been quite happy with my results, or there simply hasn’t been enough traffic to make a nice long exposure trail from the headlights and tail lights. I think the key was not trying this at 1 am on a weekday this time around!

   If there is sufficient traffic you can do a few things to try to get a good light trail across the bridge. I usually count how long it takes the the cars to get out of sight from my end of the bridge, and see if I can have an exposure long enough to try to get the whole light trail. Completely forgot to do this last night but it worked out anyway. From the variations I made yesterday, this one was my favourite for a few reasons. First, you can see the faint outline of Grouse Mountain in the background – another benefit of not shooting this at 1am. Next, the light trails are mostly complete from one end of the bridge to the other, and there are even two lane changes that took place at exactly the right time to create a crossover. What is truly something I will be unlikely to replicate again is that dotted light trail you see coming up the left side of the bridge on the sidewalk. A cyclist was coming in our direction with a flashing headlight on his bike. I didn’t notice this at the time but upon reviewing my exposure noticed it in the LCD. I do think it adds a bit of uniqueness to most images I’ve made from this location.

More of my bridge photos can be found in my Bridges Gallery.