A few Random Photos from Stanley Park in Vancouver

Fall foliage colors on Maple trees along the Stanley Park Seawall at the west end of Coal Harbour.

fall leaves on the stanley park seawall coal harbour vancouver

Fall Foliage along the Stanley Park Seawall in Vancouver (Purchase)

Last Fall I made several trips into Burnaby and Vancouver to photograph various areas – and twice I wound up at Vancouver’s Stanley Park as my late afternoon/evening destination. Fall foliage in 2020 was hit and miss, and in some areas just plain bad. In this part of Vancouver, however, it was pretty decent in many places. Stanley Park is always a good spot to look for fall foliage, and even if there isn’t any, I never dislike an evening spent there. Even in the rain! After a walk around Lost Lagoon and a few other park areas, I headed further towards downtown to Devonian Harbour Park and made this photograph of a few people walking along the Seawall with some good fall leaves as a backdrop. This location is next to the Vancouver Rowing Club building at the west end of Coal Harbour.

lights on canada place in vancouver

Colourful lights on the sails of Canada Place (Purchase)

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I have photographed Canada Place many times, but not always at a higher resolution, so I made the above photograph and a few others to change that. Zoomed in at 100% you can’t tell the title of a book someone on one of the benches is reading, but you can tell what colour the cover is! I was going to make some panoramas including Canada Place and the Trade and Convention Centre next door, but the pandemic thwarted those plans. Not only are there not conventions going on at the moment, but some floors of the newer Convention Centre space are still reserved for a makeshift hospital should the pandemic overwhelm local hospitals (which has not happened, luckily). As a consequence all the lights on many of its floors are off. It just doesn’t look great in the evening with the lights off, so I skipped it entirely. Canada Place is my favourite anyway, and I like this colour scheme of lights on the “sails”. Sometimes I don’t like the colours used here, and really do prefer the light projections they had back in 2012. Not sure how often these are changed, but I liked the 2020 version.

Lost Lagoon

sunset light trees along shoreline lost lagoon

Evening light on trees along the shore of Lost Lagoon at Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada (Purchase)

I have visited Lost Lagoon many times in Stanley Park, but had never walked all the way around it. I fixed that in October and walked the entire loop. There was not much left in the way of fall leaves, but I did like the scene above in the way that the light lit up the edges of the trees (mostly Red Alder, here) even without their leaves. I didn’t photograph the waterfowl around the lagoon much at all, as I knew I had a lot of those kinds of photographs from my earlier trips to Burnaby Lake Regional Park. I did photograph the Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) below on the walk though. This one seemed to be having a bit of a dispute with the passing Wood Ducks who swam really close on their way by. This Heron was opening up its beak and making a lot of squawking noises to tell them to keep their distance (I presume). Songbirds they are not!

great blue heron at lost lagoon at stanley park in vancouver

A Mildly Irked Great Blue Heron (Ardea herodias) at Lost Lagoon at Stanley Park (Purchase)

Brockton Point Lighthouse

sunset lights up sky behind the brockton point lighthouse

Sunset Lights Up The Sky Behind the Brockton Point Lighthouse (Purchase)

I enjoy sunset light and while I don’t often sit around and wait for it, I am always happy to use it when available. When I stopped at Brockton Point in Stanley Park to photograph the Brockton Point Lighthouse and various subjects in North Vancouver, I got lucky with some high cloud that turned a nice pink colour. The Brockton Point Lighthouse was built in 1914 and sits along the northeast part of the Stanley Park seawall. The area gives nice views of Burrard Inlet, North Vancouver, the Lions Gate Bridge, as well as downtown and the Port of Vancouver. A bit later in the evening I made this panorama of the view of North Vancouver with Mount Seymour behind it. There are a lot of new towers and construction since I last photographed North Van from across the inlet, but the shipping traffic is omnipresent. While I’d prefer they weren’t in the photograph, I included the large bulk carrier Federal Illinois on the right as that kind of ship is a very frequent presence on the water there. I plan on making this photograph again when I am able to get back to Stanley Park while there is some snow on the mountains.

north vancouver and mount seymour from brockton point in stanley park

North Vancouver and Mount Seymour from Brockton Point in Stanley Park (Purchase)

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Lumberman’s Arch

lumbermans arch at stanley park

Lumberman’s Arch and a path through a double row of London Plane Trees (Platanus x acerifolia) (Purchase)

Originally this area was a village site called Xwáýxway before the Federal Government “claimed it” as their own. The Lumberman’s Arch above was erected in 1952, replacing an older arch called the Bowie Arch which was dismantled in 1947. The gravel path in this photograph winds south through the Lumberman’s Arch picnic area, past the Aquarium (behind the green fence on the left) to the Japanese Canadian War Memorial and beyond. The trees lining this path are called London Plane Trees (Platanus x acerifolia) and this appears to be the only spot they are planted in Stanley Park.

When I was in this same area a week later I photographed the Lions Gate Bridge from the Stanley Park Seawall. I’ve always liked this bridge at night with the reflection off the water of Burrard Inlet and the lights of West Vancouver beyond. This is a scene that I often shoot as a panorama as it fits the shape of the bridge well, and it eliminates a distracting, lighter coloured sky above that can happen during sunsets. There is no sky in the photograph below. The Lions Gate Bridge was opened in 1938 and was designated a National Historic Site of Canada in 2005. The official name of the bridge is actually the First Narrow Bridge, though I rarely hear it actually called that.

lions gate bridge at night from stanley park

Lights illuminate the Lions Gate Bridge and the waters of Burrard Inlet at night (Purchase)

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Painter’s Circle

fall foliage and benches at painters circle in stanley park

Fall Foliage at Painter’s Circle in Stanley Park (Purchase)

Painter’s Circle is one of the areas in Stanley Park where artists (but not photographers) can sell their work with a permit. I liked these 3 park benches in Painter’s Circle lined up with the fall leaves behind them and made this photograph. I am not sure what species of trees these are, and normally that would really bother me but since so many different, non-native species are planted in Stanley Park this isn’t unusual. In some cases I can find mention of them such as the London Plane trees near the Lumbermans’ Arch above, but this is a bit more of an obscure location. These look to be much younger trees and perhaps do not have as well a documented history. I should have tried the app Seek by iNaturalist on them but I didn’t remember to do so at the time. Sometimes I’ll take a closeup of leaves on a plant I can’t identify and that app will ID right off the computer screen too. Even if it doesn’t know the species it quite often points me in the right direction. Really useful app!

More photos from Stanley Park can be found in my Stanley Park Gallery.

Stanley Park Pavilion

Wisteria and other plants around the Stanley Park Pavilion and Stanley’s Bar and Grill at Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

stanley park pavilion in vancouvers stanley park

The Stanley Park Dining Pavilion (Purchase)

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   Among many other park features, I enjoy the architecture/design of the historic buildings in Stanley Park. These include the Vancouver Rowing Club, Rose Garden Cottage and the Stanley Park Dining Pavilion shown above. The Stanley Park Pavilion was built in 1911 and features the Lord Stanley Ballroom, the Rose Garden Tea Room, and Stanley’s Bar and Grill. The Stanley Park Ecology Society also has it’s offices in the Pavilion.

For more photographs of Stanley Park visit my (new!) Stanley Park Gallery.

Views from Vancouver’s Coal Harbour

Panorama of Coal Harbour from Stanley Park seawall along the western end of Coal Harbour in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

bagley lakes fall panorama

Panorama of Vancouver and Coal Harbour from Stanley Park (Purchase)

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   During my last trip to Vancouver’s Stanley Park in October I photographed a few places I had been before from new perspectives. After having visited the Air Force Garden of Remembrance for the second time I headed to the west end of Coal Harbour. I have photographed some of the buildings of Vancouver’s West End before, but most often from further into Stanley Park near the Totem poles or the 9’oclock Gun. The first panorama here shows a very wide view of what you can see of Vancouver from the end of Coal Harbour. On the left you can see the boat houses of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club (and the cranes of Port Vancouver behind them), Canada Place and the Trade and Convention Center, the buildings of downtown Vancouver, and finally Devonian Harbour Park and the apartment and condo towers in the West End.

fog at whytecliff park in west vancouver british columbia canada

Sailboats moored at the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and Vancouver Rowing Club (Purchase)

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   The second photograph shows one of the views in Stanley Park from the seawall looking towards downtown Vancouver. These boats are moored at the Vancouver Rowing Club – a building familiar to most as it sits at the entrance of Stanley Park next to Georgia Street.

   Finally we have the photograph below looking towards the West End condo towers from the seawall next to the Vancouver Rowing Club.

condo and apartment towers in the west end of vancouver from the vancouver rowing club

Sailboats at the Vancouver Rowing Club (Purchase)

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For more of my recent Vancouver area photography please visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery.

Stanley Park’s Air Force Garden of Remembrance

Fall flowers and the wishing well at the Air Force Garden of Remembrance in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

flowers at air force garden of remembrance in vancouvers stanley park

Air Force Garden of Remembrance (Purchase)

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   One of the many small areas in Vancouver’s Stanley Park that has been on my list to photograph is the Air Force Garden of Remembrance. This is a small area, located just west of the Stanley Park Dining Pavilion and contains a bench, a small garden, a waterfall and a pond. The garden was created in 1948 to commemorate the Air Force personnel who died in World War II. I had previously photographed this in the fall fo 2013, but came back hoping for some nicer leaf colours and a few more of the flowers still around – and I picked the right time this year. The pond’s waterfall was dry, however – likely due to our historic dry summer months in 2015.

wishing well and bench at air force garden of remembrance in vancouvers stanley park

Wishing Well at the Air Force Garden of Remembrance (Purchase)

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   I haven’t tried the starburst/sunburst trick before. It can be a bit of a gimmick in my opinion – you’ll see some photo galleries with the majority of shots with a sunburst in them. Here the sun was right in the way, and I either embraced it in my composition or tried to block it with tree trunks or foliage. Setting the aperture to f/16 and f/18 allowed this effect to work in these photographs. I like the results, but I will probably only use this technique when the sun is getting in the way.

   The photograph below isn’t from the Air Force Garden of Remembrance, but is actually just above the Stanley Park Rose Garden. I liked the way the Douglas Fir trunks lined up, though this certainly doesn’t show a natural forest setting.

silverhope creek fall foliage colours

Fall leaves on the ground in the forest at Stanley Park (Purchase)

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For more of my recent Vancouver area photography please visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery.

Lions Gate Bridge from Ambleside Park

The Lions Gate Bridge, Stanley Park, and downtown Vancouver from Ambleside Beach in West Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

lions gate bridge stanley park and downtown vancouver

Lions Gate Bridge, Stanley Park, and Downtown Vancouver from Ambleside Park (Purchase)

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After a bit of hiking last week around Mount Seymour, I headed to Ambleside Park in West Vancouver to see if that location would offer a favourable view of Stanley Park, downtown Vancouver and the Lions Gate Bridge. I have photographed the Lions Gate from Brockton Point and Prospect Points in Stanley Park before, and wanted a new view of the Bridge. As it turns out, I think Ambleside Park actually offers a better view of the bridge than from most of Stanley Park. Clear and unobstructed, and during dusk at least – with a nicer background that is more evenly lit. The only issues I had last week at Ambleside were the giant tankers coming into the port occasionally and the nearly full (and not super) moon just above the bridge.

You can find more photographs of bridges in my Bridges Gallery.

Rose Garden Cottage at Stanley Park

The Rose Garden Cottage (built during WWI) at the Rose Garden in Stanley Park, Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

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The Rose Garden Cottage near the Rose Garden in Vancouver’s Stanley Park

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   I was not able to find a lot of information on the Rose Garden Cottage in Stanley Park. The Rose Cottage was built during World War I (reportedly in 1914) and now functions as a building in the service yard of the Mounted Division of the Vancouver Police Department. In October I made this photograph of the Rose Garden Cottage in one of the few areas of Stanley Park not obscured by fog. I could barely see the Lions Gate Bridge and you could not view downtown Vancouver from Stanley Park at all! I was happy to find the cottage and rose garden area relatively free of fog – with even a little sunshine breaking through occasionally.

   See more of my photographs from the Vancouver Coast & Mountains.

Cherry Blossoms in Stanley Park

Spring Cherry blossoms along the South Creek Trail in Stanley Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada

spring cherry blossoms in stanley park in vancouver british columbia

Spring Cherry Blossoms in Stanley Park (Purchase)

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   One of the first subjects I like to photograph in the Spring, in addition to wildflowers, are the Cherry trees in Vancouver. There are often a lot of flower bulbs also in bloom (tulips, daffodils etc) at the same time, so there are often great photo opportunities at that time of year. This past April I was in Vancouver’s Stanley Park and made some photographs of these Cherry trees blooming along the South Creek Trail (near the Rose Garden). I love photographing Stanley Park, once the sun starts go to down there are always other opportunities to photograph the Lions Gate Bridge or the downtown skyline.

My Top 10 Photos of 2012

   I always find it difficult to narrow down a years worth of photographs into one list of the “best”. It is a good exercise, however, to really sit down and go through your work and determine what images best fit your current vision for your photography. I did this back in 2010 and 2011 as a part of Jim Goldstein’s project and I am please to enter my images again for this years version.

   All of these photographs are available as Fine Art Prints.

   So in no particular order these are the “top” (probably better termed as favourite) photos I have made in 2012.

kalamalka lake provincial park panorama
Kalamalka Lake Provincial Park Spring Panorama

(Coldstream, British Columbia)

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