Posts Tagged ‘rivers’

Little Qualicum River Fall Colors

Fall colours and fog along the Little Qualicum River in Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park on Vancouver Island, British Columbia, Canada.

fall colours and fog at the little qualicum river in little qualicum falls provincial park

Fall Colors at the Little Qualicum River (Purchase)

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   I made this photograph of the Little Qualicum River in 2012 during a trip to Vancouver Island near Qualicum Beach, British Columbia. It is always interesting to make a number of photographs from one location, pick a few for a blog post or to highlight on social media, and then find out that the public is drawn to an entirely different image. In the case of Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park – the above photo is the winner and the others I chose for my blog post about the area haven’t gained the same traction. I’ve sold this image multiple times and even the copyright infringers seem to love it over the other selections. At the time I made this photo I was drawn to the rocks around the river and the fall foliage (mostly Bigleaf Maples) together with the low cloud in the upper background. This scene is next to the bridge just above Upper Little Qualicum Falls, though I do believe there is now a fence that prevents exploring the area along the river.

For all of my photographs from this provincial Park take a look at my Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park Gallery.

Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park

The Coquihalla River and the Othello Tunnels at Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park in Hope, British Columbia, Canada.

bridge over the coquihalla river and othello tunnels at coquihalla canyon provincial park

Bridge over the Coquihalla River at Othello Tunnels (Purchase)

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   Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park sits in the Coquihalla Gorge very near to Hope, British Columbia, Canada. I hadn’t visited this park since 2012, which might have been the most recent year of truly great fall colour in this part of BC. During that visit I didn’t walk all the way to the Othello Tunnels and instead headed to Silver Lake (which, considering the fall foliage there was a good choice). In early October I was at Coquihalla Canyon again and decided to photograph the tunnels, bridges and the river. There wasn’t much in the way of fall foliage this time around, but many of the compositions available for the river, bridges and tunnels don’t have much fall foliage potential anyway.

othello tunnels in coquihalla canyon

The Othello Tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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   Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park’s main trail follows the old CPR Kettle Valley Railway route through the Coquihalla Gorge which earlier linked Hope to the Thompson Okanagan as far as Midway, BC. The 5 tunnels in the park are collectively known as the Othello Tunnels (or the Othello-Quintette Tunnels) and were constructed in 1914. It seems the engineer for these bridges and tunnels was a Shakespeare fan – other stations in the area had names such as Portia, Iago, and Romeo & Juliet.

smooth rocks in the coquihalla river in coquihalla canyon

Smooth Rocks in the Coquihalla River (Purchase)

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   I always bring a flashlight to navigate these tunnels. One especially is fairly long and has a point where you can’t see much light from either end. It is easy enough to navigate without one, but I prefer to avoid the water filled potholes that form from the groundwater dripping through the tunnel ceilings. Falling down with my camera equipment in the dark isn’t usually high on my todo list. This time I ticked off some other visitors as they thought a flashlight was rude. I guess they wanted to fall down in the dark?

othello tunnels in coquihalla canyon

The Othello/Quinette Tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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   The bridges and tunnels aren’t the only attractions here, the Coquihalla River and the gorge walls are visible much of the time while walking through the park. There are interesting shapes in rocks worn smooth by the flow of the river and the canyon walls themselves are interesting. The panorama below shows one of these spots just before one of the tunnels. The canyon walls can be as much as 300 feet high, so there are always interesting rock formations to look at.

coquihalla river in coquihalla canyon

The Coquihalla River in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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For more of my photographs from British Columbia’s Provincial parks please visit my BC Provincial Parks Collection.

Little Campbell River Estuary

The Little Campbell River Estuary in Surrey, British Columbia, Canada.

little campbell river estuary in white rock, bc

The Little Campbell River Estuary in White Rock

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   This is the Little Campbell River just before it empties into Boundary/Semiahmoo Bay near White Rock, British Columbia. It was a bit of luck that I found this scene at high tide, as the mud here the rest of the time just isn’t as photogenic. I’ve since remembered to consult tide charts when photographing scenes along the coast such as this one or those in Crescent Beach.

cascade creek in cascade falls regional park

Great Blue Heron fishing the banks of the Little Campbell River

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   In addition to the river itself I photographed this Great Blue Heron fishing along the banks. I often like to photograph wildlife in the context of its environment. These were quite different surroundings from the last Heron I photographed just outside of Stanley Park.

For more of my photography from this area visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery.

Ohanapecosh River Fall Foliage

Vine Maple (Acer circinatum) fall foliage colors along the Ohanapecosh River at the Grove of the Patriarchs – Mount Rainier National Park, Washington State, USA.

ohanapecosh river fall foliage colors in mount rainier national park

Fall Foliage at the Ohanapecosh River in Mount Rainier National Park

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   I first photographed this scene at the Ohanapecosh River in Mount Rainier National Park in the fall of 2009. This spot is right next to the small suspension bridge that crosses the Ohanapecosh River on the trail to the Grove of the Patriarchs. I liked the fall foliage colors of these Vine Maple (Acer circinatum trees along the blue waters of the river. I have visited this spot a few times since during the fall and have either been there when the leaves are still green, or after they have turned brown and begun to fall off – but it is always a nice spot to eat lunch. I’d love to photograph this scene again with a fuller extent of oranges and reds in the foliage, but that will be a matter of getting my timing right. Now that I’ve discovered what the park is like when the wildflowers are in full bloom which is usually in August, exploring Rainier for fall foliage colours may have to wait a few more years.

For more photographs of this area including other versions of this scene please visit my Mount Rainier National Park Gallery in the Image Library.

Ruskin Dam in Mission BC

   On my way to Rolley Lake Provincial Park a few weeks ago I stopped to photograph near the Ruskin Dam on the Stave River in Mission, British Columbia, Canada. After several heavy rainstorms in October the excess water collected in Stave Lake is released over the Ruskin Dam. The Dam is currently undergoing a refit and reconstruction to upgrade the original structure built in the 1930’s – which is why you see the crane tower and all the scaffolding and work materials here. Only 3 of the 7 original spillways are currently flowing – after the refit there will be a total of 5.

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Ruskin Dam in Mission, BC

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I also recorded a video of the Ruskin Dam water flow which indicates the sheer volume a little better than the photograph above. You can imagine the roar of the water coming over the dam, but there is no sound on this video because in addition to that all you’d hear would be the traffic of the road and a conversation between two fisherman nearby!

Mount Shuksan and the Nooksack River

Mount Shuksan towers over the confluence of Swamp Creek and the North Fork of the Nooksack River in the Mount Baker-Snoqualmie National Forest in Washington State, USA

mount shuksan and the nooksack river

Mount Shuksan and the Nooksack River

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   This is another one of my lunch spots in the North Cascades of Washington State. The North Fork of the Nooksack River runs next to the Mount Baker Highway at many points, this one being just below the point where the highway starts climbing in elevation towards the Mt. Baker ski area. A short drive east up a gravel road and you are presented with this view where Swamp Creek runs into the Nooksack. I only wish the deciduous trees that lined the river at this point were Vine or Bigleaf Maples, as these Red Alder never develop much fall colours.

See more of my photography from this area in my North Cascades Gallery.

Skutz Falls on the Cowichan River

Skutz Falls along the Cowichan River at Cowichan River Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada

skutz falls along the cowichan river in cowichan river provincial park

The Cowichan River’s Skutz Falls in Cowichan River Provincial Park

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   A panorama photograph of Skutz Falls I made last spring during a visit to Cowichan River Provincial Park. Judging from other photographs I have seen it would appear this day had rather high water levels in the Cowichan River. I suspect a return trip some fall when there is nice autumn colours will be in order. I suspect the water levels will be about right at that time of year.

You can view more photographs from Vancouver Island in my Vancouver Island Gallery.

Little Qualicum Falls in Spring

Spring runoff at Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park in British Columbia, Canada

upper little qualicum falls in spring

Upper Little Qualicum Falls at Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park

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   Earlier this year I visited Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park on British Columbia’s Vancouver Island. The falls and area surrounding the river were much greener than they were the previous autumn which gives these photos a much different look. You can see the difference between the photo above and the Little Qualicum Falls photos I made last year. This time there were people at a weddding scrambling up the trail in light coloured, long dresses (not good on a muddy trail), suits and ties, and high heels. None of these seemed to have worked out very well for them – I saw lots of fancy, muddy shoes and at least one muddy dress. Not ideal clothing if you are intending to visit the falls btw. 😉

You can see other photos from Little Qualicum Falls Provincial Park in my image library.