Posts Tagged ‘panorama’

North Vancouver Industry and Buildings

View of the buildings and industrial areas of North Vancouver, Burrard Inlet, and Mount Seymour from downtown Vancouver.

view of north vancouver and mount seymour from downtown vancouver

View of North Vancouver and Mount Seymour from downtown Vancouver (Purchase)

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   I tend to associate North Vancouver with wilderness, mountains, waterfalls, and skiing. My usual destinations in North Van are usually areas such as Mount Seymour and Lynn Canyon Park. Looking at North Vancouver from Vancouver you can see the mountains and the forests, but there is a lot of industrial land along the waterfront as well. The first panorama shows cargo ships picking up grain from various grain terminals on the North Shore. Mount Seymour, as with many photographs of North Vancouver, makes for a good background and is home to one of 3 ski hills on the North Shore. North Shore industries such as shipyards, lumber and coal export, are also present along the edge of Burrard Inlet.

north vancouver sulphur mountains

View of North Vancouver Industrial Shoreline from Vancouver (Purchase)

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   The second panorama here shows the industrial waterfront a bit further west than the first. One of the more familiar industrial uses that people recognize are the large sulphur piles at the North Vancouver Sulphur Works. Here the “La Bamba” which is registered in the Marshall Islands is docked and loading Sulphur. There are also large piles of coal for export further east in North Vancouver. Crown and Grouse Mountains (which is home to Grouse Mountain Resort) form the background here.

For more photographs of North Vancouver visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery.

View of Glen Valley Farmland and the Fraser River

View of Glen Valley farmland, the Fraser River, and Coquitlam/Burnaby Mountain from Bradner Road in Abbotsford, British Columbia, Canada.

panorama of glen valley farmland and the fraser river in langley abbotsford

View of Glen Valley Farmland in Langley and Abbotsford (Purchase)

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   This view of Glen Valley’s farmland is one that I had forgotten about for many years. I remember looking out the car window and seeing this view as a kid from the backseat of my parents’ car. On a rare, non rainy day last fall I remembered the viewpoint when I was nearby, and decided to drive up to Bradner Road to see if it was still there. I was happy to find it hadn’t been overgrown by trees and still offered good views of Glen Valley below. It wasn’t the clearest day but I think I will be back there in the spring to see if sunset offers any interesting light from this vantage point.

view of glen valley farms in abbotsford and langley

View of Glen Valley (Purchase)

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   One of the common crops farmed in Glen Valley are cranberries and blueberries. The bottom left of the above photograph shows one of the many partially flooded cranberry field after harvest. The fields are flooded in the fall so that the berries float to the surface (after a bit of a beating) for easy collection.

glen valley farmland and the fraser river

Glen Valley Farmland and the Fraser River (Purchase)

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   The third photo here shows Glen Valley, The Fraser River, Macmillan Island, Coquitlam, and Burnaby Mountain beyond. I was a bit surprised how far I could see from this elevation. The top of the Port Mann Bridge and many taller buildings in Surrey were also visible.

For more photos of Glen Valley and the surrounding region please visit my Fraser Valley Gallery.

Langley Bog in Derby Reach Regional Park

Langley Bog from the new viewing platform at Derby Reach Regional Park (Houston Trail) in Langley, British Columbia, Canada.

langley bog viewing platform and the coast mountains from derby reach regional park

Langley Bog from Derby Reach Park Viewing Platform (Purchase)

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   A few weeks ago I went to the Langley Bog for the first time as there was a new viewing platform off of the Houston Trail in Derby Reach Regional Park. I had never walked on the Houston Trail but was aware of it and the bog (which is generally closed to the public) on my many drives past the trailhead. While the Langley Bog is a very interesting place biologically, I didn’t find all that much insight into that via the viewing platform (built by the Derby Reach Brae Island Parks Association). Granted, everything was frozen solid at the time and spring/summer may yield more wildlife viewing and other interesting things. This may be a good spot for birding in the future. I also hope that this is not the end of construction. Burns Bog has a lot of trails and boardwalks (via the Delta Nature Reserve) where you can walk, with relatively low disturbance of the bog itself. It would be nice if this kind of thing could be incorporated into Langley Bog in the future.

For more photos of the Langley area visit my Fraser Valley Gallery.

Mt. Erie Park Moonrise Over the North Cascades

The moon rises over North Cascades mountain peaks just after sunset. Photographed from the top of Mt. Erie Park in Anacortes, Washington State, USA.

panorama of moonrise over the north cascades range from mt erie park

Moonrise over the North Cascades from Mt. Erie Park (Purchase)

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   In September I went on a day trip across the border into Blaine, Washington and eventually ended up at Mt. Erie Park in Anacortes on Fidalgo Island. The plan had been to follow the coast and hit a lot of different spots on the way to Fidalgo Island and Anacortes with Mt. Erie Park being the last destination. It turned out this was a bit overly ambitions so when I arrived in Anacortes it was already early evening. I’ve learned from experience that when time gets short to have a plan for the final destination in place, and so after visiting Anacortes I drove up the narrow road to the top of Mt. Erie. This was a park that seemed like it had a decent chance at good views – and they turned out to be great views. This first panorama photograph here shows several peaks I photographed from the park – mainly (from L to R) Round Mountain, Mount Higgins, Glacier Peak, White Chuck Mountain, Whitehorse Mountain Three Fingers, and Liberty Mountain.

moonrise over the north cascades range from mt erie

Moonrise over the North Cascades and Similk Bay from Mt. Erie (Purchase)

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   I’d like to say I had planned my timing with this moon rise perfectly, but it was just a pleasant surprise. Many photographers determine sunrise and sunset paths before photographing an area but I don’t often do this – especially on a relatively unplanned day such as this one. There are plenty of great views from the top of Mount Erie – from Mount Baker and a number of other notable peaks in the North Cascades to the view south towards Whidbey Island, The Olympic Mountains and the Straight of Juan de Fuca. The three photos here show the view to the east and southeast of the North Cascades, and the farmland on the mainland.

moonrise over the north cascades range in black and white

Moonrise over the North Cascades in B&W (Purchase)

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   I thought I’d try this last photograph in Black and White, and I think it works (more so with the enlarged view compared to this thumbnail). You can view the colour version for comparison. The peaks in this photograph include (L to R) Round Mountain, Mount Higgins, Skadulgwas Peak, White Chuck Mountain, Glacier Peak, Disappointment Peak and Whitehorse Mountain.

For more photographs from the North Cascades visit my North Cascades Gallery.

Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park

The Coquihalla River and the Othello Tunnels at Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park in Hope, British Columbia, Canada.

bridge over the coquihalla river and othello tunnels at coquihalla canyon provincial park

Bridge over the Coquihalla River at Othello Tunnels (Purchase)

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   Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park sits in the Coquihalla Gorge very near to Hope, British Columbia, Canada. I hadn’t visited this park since 2012, which might have been the most recent year of truly great fall colour in this part of BC. During that visit I didn’t walk all the way to the Othello Tunnels and instead headed to Silver Lake (which, considering the fall foliage there was a good choice). In early October I was at Coquihalla Canyon again and decided to photograph the tunnels, bridges and the river. There wasn’t much in the way of fall foliage this time around, but many of the compositions available for the river, bridges and tunnels don’t have much fall foliage potential anyway.

othello tunnels in coquihalla canyon

The Othello Tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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   Coquihalla Canyon Provincial Park’s main trail follows the old CPR Kettle Valley Railway route through the Coquihalla Gorge which earlier linked Hope to the Thompson Okanagan as far as Midway, BC. The 5 tunnels in the park are collectively known as the Othello Tunnels (or the Othello-Quintette Tunnels) and were constructed in 1914. It seems the engineer for these bridges and tunnels was a Shakespeare fan – other stations in the area had names such as Portia, Iago, and Romeo & Juliet.

smooth rocks in the coquihalla river in coquihalla canyon

Smooth Rocks in the Coquihalla River (Purchase)

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   I always bring a flashlight to navigate these tunnels. One especially is fairly long and has a point where you can’t see much light from either end. It is easy enough to navigate without one, but I prefer to avoid the water filled potholes that form from the groundwater dripping through the tunnel ceilings. Falling down with my camera equipment in the dark isn’t usually high on my todo list. This time I ticked off some other visitors as they thought a flashlight was rude. I guess they wanted to fall down in the dark?

othello tunnels in coquihalla canyon

The Othello/Quinette Tunnels in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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   The bridges and tunnels aren’t the only attractions here, the Coquihalla River and the gorge walls are visible much of the time while walking through the park. There are interesting shapes in rocks worn smooth by the flow of the river and the canyon walls themselves are interesting. The panorama below shows one of these spots just before one of the tunnels. The canyon walls can be as much as 300 feet high, so there are always interesting rock formations to look at.

coquihalla river in coquihalla canyon

The Coquihalla River in Coquihalla Canyon (Purchase)

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For more of my photographs from British Columbia’s Provincial parks please visit my BC Provincial Parks Collection.

View of Downtown Vancouver from North Van

Downtown Vancouver’s buildings at sunset as photographed from the Burrard Dry Dock Pier (near Londsdale Quay) in North Vancouver, British Columbia Canada.

downtown vancouver at sunset photographed from North Vancouver

Sunset Behind Downtown Vancouver (Purchase)

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   While I consider myself a landscape and nature photographer I do enjoy photographing almost anything – including cityscapes. I have photographed several panoramas of downtown Vancouver in the past, though most of these have been from various vantage points in Stanley Park and some from Kits Beach. I have been wanting to do the same from North Vancouver’s perspective and had the opportunity to do so a few weeks ago.

   I had spent the day photographing around North Vancouver in areas such as Maple Flats, Cates Park, and Deep Cove. When the light was running out at Deep Cove I determined that this would be a good chance to shoot the sunset and downtown Vancouver from somewhere in North Van. I had previously tried this at the dog park near the automall, but there always seems to be a large amount of barges and boats blocking the view from there. I’d heard that near Londsdale Quay would be a better spot, so I headed there from Deep Cove. There has been a lot of changes in that area since I was last there, so I had to find my way to various viewpoints in new ways. I wound up on the Burrard Dry Dock Pier (just east of Londsdale Quay) which offers a great view of downtown Vancouver. I was able to make some good photographs here including the one above. While I had to dodge the Seabus and a few other boats moving through the foreground (and their wakes) this turned out to be a great location to view Vancouver.

For more photographs of downtown Vancouver visit my Cities and Buildings Gallery.

Sunset at Kitsilano Beach Park in Vancouver

Kitsilano Beach Park and buildings in the West End and downtown Vancouver at sunset. Photographed from Kitsilano Beach Park in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

kits beach sunset panorama vancouver city

Sunset at Kisilano Beach Park in the City of Vancouver (Purchase)

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   Earlier I shared some blue hour photos of similar scenes of Kitsilano Beach Park, Vancouver’s West End, and English Bay that I made back in March. The two photographs here were made about 20 minutes earlier when there were some sunset colours in the sky, and even a hint of Earth’s shadow (aka the Belt of Venus – top, right). This is the kind of sunset photograph I enjoy – the light from sunset in the sky, on the mountains and the buildings to the east. I was in Vancouver on this day due to the good weather and that we had just had some fresh snow on the Northshore Mountains – conditions that had eluded me the previous winter. The top photograph here includes Mount Seymour with some fresh snow above the buildings of the West End of Vancouver city. I think the two make a good combination.

kitsilano beach and the boathouse restaurant at sunset

Kitsilano Beach and the Boathouse Restaurant at Sunset (Purchase)

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   The second photograph here shows the Boathouse Restaurant at Kitsilano Beach Park during the night’s sunset. It had not yet become chilly at this point in the evening, so there were still quite a few tourists and locals on the beach. On a typical summer day (I shot this in March) I doubt you’d be able to see any sand around the beach goers from this vantage point – Kits is a rather popular beach during the summer.

For more photographs of Cities and Buildings (mostly Vancouver) visit my Cities & Buildings Gallery.

Views from Vancouver’s Coal Harbour

Panorama of Coal Harbour from Stanley Park seawall along the western end of Coal Harbour in Vancouver, British Columbia, Canada.

bagley lakes fall panorama

Panorama of Vancouver and Coal Harbour from Stanley Park (Purchase)

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   During my last trip to Vancouver’s Stanley Park in October I photographed a few places I had been before from new perspectives. After having visited the Air Force Garden of Remembrance for the second time I headed to the west end of Coal Harbour. I have photographed some of the buildings of Vancouver’s West End before, but most often from further into Stanley Park near the Totem poles or the 9’oclock Gun. The first panorama here shows a very wide view of what you can see of Vancouver from the end of Coal Harbour. On the left you can see the boat houses of the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club (and the cranes of Port Vancouver behind them), Canada Place and the Trade and Convention Center, the buildings of downtown Vancouver, and finally Devonian Harbour Park and the apartment and condo towers in the West End.

fog at whytecliff park in west vancouver british columbia canada

Sailboats moored at the Royal Vancouver Yacht Club and Vancouver Rowing Club (Purchase)

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   The second photograph shows one of the views in Stanley Park from the seawall looking towards downtown Vancouver. These boats are moored at the Vancouver Rowing Club – a building familiar to most as it sits at the entrance of Stanley Park next to Georgia Street.

   Finally we have the photograph below looking towards the West End condo towers from the seawall next to the Vancouver Rowing Club.

condo and apartment towers in the west end of vancouver from the vancouver rowing club

Sailboats at the Vancouver Rowing Club (Purchase)

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For more of my recent Vancouver area photography please visit my Vancouver Coast & Mountains Gallery.